Latest Blogs

Madhubani in Making

Created On : 10-Aug-2017 Written By: Chanchal Published In: Exploring Indian Art Series Hits: 186 Comment: 0

Jyoti was re-doing her house in Bangalore and wanted a Madhubani painting to adorn her drawing room wall. After multiple calls and detailed discussions on phone to understand her requirement, I visited to see her house. Construction was on and some parts were yet to be finished, however the drawing room was ready. My initial thoughts were, if we should do the panting on the wall directly or shall we consider a canvas such as fabric/hand-made paper.  Although Jyoti wanted to get the painting to be directly done on the wall however after considering everything (Logistics, Artist Stay and the fact that construction was still on) she made up her mind to get the painting done on a canvas and we chose Paper Silk as a medium. Given the wall size we froze on the size of the painting ~ 8 feet wide and 4 feet in height.   

 
Paper Silk
 

Stories across India ~ Odisha

Created On : 05-Apr-2017 Written By: Chanchal Published In: Exploring Indian Art Series Hits: 61 Comment: 0

It is a long post - but we request you all to be with us. We want to share this story with you all and thank you all!!!

Hand-block Printing Vs Screen Printing

Created On : 29-Mar-2017 Written By: Chanchal Published In: Exploring Indian Art Series Hits: 147 Comment: 0

Screen Printing

While we were in Bagru our artisan team shared their worries about competition from Screen printing process. For last few years, screen printing process is being used for every type of block printing work ranging from Machilipatnam Kalamkari to Dabu. It is a faster way of block printing where big screen mesh are used in with screen frames. A screen is made of a piece of mesh stretched over a frame. A stencil is made by blocking off parts of the screen, forming the negative image of the design to be printed. 

 

Hand-block printing ~ beautiful work from Bagru, Rajasthan (Part III)

Created On : 17-Mar-2017 Written By: Chanchal Published In: Exploring Indian Art Series Hits: 147 Comment: 0

Continuing from our last blog in the series of Hand-block printing from Rajasthan

Indigo

Indigo process follows the Dabu printing. Dabu printed area acts like a resistant for Indigo dye. The process starts after the first layer of Dabu printing is done and the fabric has dried up. Indigo powder is mixed up in deep bore wells. The fabric is then dipped in this water.

As a safety measure and also to avoid getting the colors on their hands, artisans wear rubber gloves.